• Margaret Herrick

My Wish to Publish My Photos


I’ve always enjoyed photography, whether it’s going to photo exhibitions - ranging from classics like Ansel Adams to contemporary photographers like Annie Leibowitz and Cindy Sherman - or taking photos myself. Photography is my way of capturing memories and visually expressing myself. My dark secret was that I wanted to share my photos. I wanted others to enjoy my images. I wanted to talk about what I saw in the subject that inspired me to take a photograph, why I framed it the way I did, and why I saw something in it that others didn't. I struggled with the “how” to make this happen: I sent some to greeting card companies; I participated in a camera club; I occasionally entered photo contests. However, somewhere along the way, I stopped struggling with the “how” of making my photos public and held onto my secret wish.


Literally decades went by. With passing time, camera technology evolved from lugging around big 35 mm SLR cameras, multiple lenses, and rolls of film to making sure my iPhone was charged. During that time, my wish practice also evolved from an informal but deeply held belief to the organized practice that we share with you on this blog and recently, my wish came true.


I never would’ve imagined a “how” like this to answer my wish.


In collaboration with Barbara, my good friend and wish maven soul mate, my photos provided the visual images in our first book, Your Path to a Fulfilling Life: Introduction to Making Your Wishes Come True. As you look through our blog now, you will see even more of my photos. Around the same time as we published our book, a local entrepreneur began hosting art exhibitions in his shop. I not only participated in those exhibitions, but I actually sold several photos. All this flowed into my life without struggle.


Upon reflection, I realized that when I tried to create a plan to achieve the “how”, I was actually creating blocks that kept me from realizing my desire. Two things were happening simultaneously. First, I began dwelling on the challenges and difficulties - the “long odds”, so to speak - of taking my photography public. At the same time, I was wallowing in a state of “Wow, who do you think you are that other people would value your photographs?” Quite simply, my wish practice dissolved these blocks. By strengthening my trust in the Universe and no longer focusing on the “how” to make it happen, I immersed myself in just taking pictures, which brought me new joy. This is how I rested in the belief that I was deserving of what came.


Let’s pause here a moment to make a distinction between what we want to eliminate in our wish practice - too much attention on “how” a wish will come true - from the “how to” that we use to explain what we are doing. How we do something is important to the practice of wishing. How wishes come true is the business we leave to the Universe.


Finally, a few words about the photo above. Mother Nature provided a rainy filter on my window through which I watched sail boats returning to their float. The result, this beautifully abstract image. One of my best photography “tips” is to pay attention to what nature presents.


Next week, in our FAQs section, we will answer the question “what’s this flying wish paper I keep hearing about?”


Until then,

Peace and All Good

Margie and Barbara

The Wish Mavens


Photo Credit


The photo featured in this post was taken by (and is copyrighted by) Margaret A. Herrick.